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Chinese Crypto Firm Show Support for WikiLeaks with 1BTC Donation after Assange’s Arrest

Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks known for leaking classified government documents, has been arrested by British police on April 11 after Ecuador refused to grant him further asylum, and faces extradition to the U.S. on conspiracy charges.

As an advocate of information transparency and very early bitcoin supporter, Assange’s arrest has seen pushback from the crypto community with WikiLeaks’ donation addresses seeing a sudden spike in bitcoin donations from all over the world.

As of press time, data from btc.com shows that WikiLeaks has received a total of 412 donations on its bitcoin address of Defend WikiLeaks since this February, more than 70% of which – over 6 BTC (roughly $31,000) – it received after Assange’s detainment.

1It is worth noting that despite the surge in donations, the total amount donated to its BTC address remains relatively small and most donations are in small amount around $5 worth bitcoin. Among all those donations, one 1BTC donation on April 14 is quite eye-catching. It was sent from Mixin Network, a China-based public blockchain dedicating to a free and lightning fast peer-to-peer transactional network for digital assets. Regarding this, its founder Cedric Fung stated,

“WikiLeaks plays a significant role in arousing people’s awareness of privacy, and privacy is exactly the focus of Mixin in both payment and communication.”

The founder of the crypto startup said they also donate $1,000 to Wikipedia every year among one of their efforts in support of free knowledge.

In addition to Bitcoin, the whistleblowing website also accepts donations in fiat (via Mastercard, Visa, Amex, Discover, bank transfer, cheque, and hard cash) and privacy-oriented cryptocurrency Zcash. While there is no data available on fiat donations, WikiLeaks‘ public Zcash address remains mostly inactive.

Wikileaks became one of the first big names to start accepting Bitcoin donations early in 2011, after Visa, Mastercard, PayPal, and Bank of America abruptly blocked transfers to its accounts.

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